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Matches 51 to 100 of 1,543

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51 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Wilson, Jason Paul (I4)
 
52 (Medical):Jean Moore is the fourth child born to Noah and Ruth Moore. Jean was born at Crossroads in the "shotgun" house. She attended Bethesda Consolidated School until the middle of sixth grade. She transferred to Lexington Grammar School for the rest of that year and until she entered the ninth grade at Lexington High School.

She won the American Legion Award in eighth grade. She played forward on the high school basketball team. She was selected as MVP at the end of her senior season and was given a small gold basketball which she wore on a chain around her neck. She graduated in May 1950 as valedictorian of her class. While in high school, Jean earned spending money working at Miller's Five and Ten-Cent Store. During one holiday season, she wrapped Christmas packages at Flowers' Department Store.

In 1950 she attended Holmes Junior College in Goodman, Mississippi. The next year she transferred to Delta State Teachers College in Cleveland, Mississippi. In 1953 she received a bachelor of science degree in elementary education. She received a scholarship to George Peabody College in Nashville, Tennessee. On June 4, 1954, she received her master of arts degree in elementary education.

Jean's teaching experience was:

1954-1956 -- Leland Elementary - Leland, Mississippi - Grade 4
1956-1957 -- Wayside Elementary - Bakersville, California - Grade 4
1957-1958 -- Smith Elementary - Victoria, Texas - Grade 5
1958-1960 -- 25th Street Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 5
1960-1961 -- Madison Heights Jr. High - Anderson, Indiana - Dean of Girls
1962-1963 -- Alexandria Jr. High, Alexandria, Indiana - Grade 6 math, science
1964-1966 -- 25th Street Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 2
1967-1976 -- 25th Street Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 2, 3
1977-1980 -- Northeast Elementary - Meridian, Mississippi - Grade 1
1985-1987 -- Forest Hills Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 2, 4
1987-1988 -- Forest Hills Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 5
1988-1989 -- Chesterfield Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 2
1989-1993 -- Greenbriar Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 1
1993-2001 -- Forest Hills Elementary - Anderson, Indiana - Grade 1, 2

Jean taught two years in Mississippi and one in California before she married Jerry Marshall. While he was stationed at Victoria Air Force Base, she taught in Victoria, Texas. The rest of her experience was either in Indiana or Mississippi as she followed Jerry to his various job placements. She spent some years at home while the children were young. Due to the closing of five elementary schools, when Jerry was transferred to Anderson in 1980, she did not teach for the next five years.

Since her retirement Jean has enjoyed helping her son, Roger and his wife Janet take care of their babies. Sometimes she and Jerry travel to North Carolina to help her daughter Susan and her husband Vic with their three children. For the past six years, Jean has helped her sisters take care of their invalid mother.

At one time Jean's hobbies were reading and playing bridge. Now she collects Dept. 56 Villages with Janet. She loves to stumble upon the 50 percent off sales. Actually she goes out looking for them. On those lucky days she returns home with her car trunk full of buildings and accessories.

Most of Jean's travel experiences have been in the United States. She has also traveled to Mexico and Canada. After Jerry's Air National Guard unit was recalled to active duty and he was sent to France, Jean and Susan joined him there. While they lived there, they visited Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Italy and Austria. 
Moore, Willie Jean (I23)
 
53 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Lemly, Jennifer Alice (I104)
 
54 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Vazquez, Jessica Marie (I47)
 
55 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Aczon, Jolene Larissa (I12)
 
56 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Aczon, Kacey Nicole (I14)
 
57 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Williams, Karey Camille (I59)
 
58 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Karla LaRae (I51)
 
59 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Katie Lynn (I117)
 
60 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Marshall, Kiley Marie (I73)
 
61 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Kristen Nicole (I50)
 
62 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Kristin Paige (I118)
 
63 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Lerch, Kyle Joseph (I70)
 
64 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Lauran Elizabeth (I111)
 
65 (Medical):Leo Ersal Alderman, husband of Lilla Eloise Moore Alderman, was born near Benton, Mississippi, in Yazoo County. When his parents first married, they lived in Yazoo County. They later moved to Holmes County where they reared their large family in the Tolarville community. Their last move was back to Yazoo County.

In 1943 Leo graduated from Coxburg Consolidated School. After working for awhile in Laurel, Mississippi, he attended many night courses at Holmes Junior College in Goodman, Mississippi. He also attended Jackson Commercial College. He took a course from Cook Radio School in Jackson, Mississippi, and received a certificate when the course was completed.

Leo entered the Army in 1944 during World War II. For his basic training, he was sent to Camp Joseph T. Robinson in Little Rock, Arkansas. After he completed basic training, he was stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia. He served a tour of duty in England and France and attained the rank of Corporal. At the Normandy Beach landing a shell exploded near him and damaged his eardrum. Leo was awarded a Purple Heart because of this injury. He did not continue with his group but did spend some time in Paris and London.

After his honorable discharge in 1946, he worked for A & N Refrigeration in Indianola, Mississippi. In 1950 Simpson, Stepp, and Lott Lumber Company hired him as a lumber salesman. He spent the next thirty-five years working for that company in Lexington, Mississippi, and retired in November 1984.

Leo and Eloise were married at the Baptist pastor's home in Long Beach, Mississippi. When Leo was younger his hobbies were traveling, fishing and making things in his shop. He was active in the Lexington Lions Club and once served as the club's president. After his retirement, he enjoyed playing cards, working crossword puzzles, watching TV and going on lengthy vacations with family and friends in his motor home. He and Eloise have visited forty-nine states, eleven Canadian provinces, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Cozumel, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Cuba and Mexico.

He and Eloise did not have children. On August 8, 2002, they had been married for fifty years.

Mini strokes beginning in 1994, along with diabetes and another mini stroke caused Leo to become legally blind. In 1999 he had a heart block and had to have a pacemaker. More mini strokes in 2000, plus the discovery of sleep apnea, took a toll on the oxygen supply to his brain causing him to not be mentally alert and physically active anymore. On October 16, 2002, Leo apparently suffered another stroke which affected his ability to speak. Home health nurses evaluated his condition over the next two days. Eloise felt he should be in the hospital, so on October 16, 2002, she called 9-1-1 for an ambulance to take him to the emergency room at the hospital in Lexington. The emergency room doctor said he was dehydrated and began giving him liquids by IV. By Monday he was showing improvement and ate three good meals. That night he seemed to be worse. Eloise asked the nurse to lower his fluid intake as he seemed to be choking on the fluids. She also asked if Leo could be taken down to the emergency room in order for the doctor on call to check him. The nurse didn't think that could be done. Around 3:00 Leo seemed to be resting more comfortably. At 5:15 the nurse woke Eloise up and asked her to leave the room. Eloise thought the nurse had probably found him dead when she made her rounds. The emergency room doctor came into the hall about forty-five minutes later and told her Leo had died. On Thursday, October 24, after a graveside service, Leo was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Lexington, Mississippi. 
Alderman, Leo Ersal (I25)
 
66 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Lester 'Melvin' (I22)
 
67 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Lilla 'Eloise' (I18)
 
68 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Vazquez, Luis Daniel (I46)
 
69 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Wilson, Malia Valdez (I15)
 
70 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Newton, Marcelyn Judith (I90)
 
71 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Marcus Melvin (I97)
 
72 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Avendano, Maria Josepha (I45)
 
73 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Vazquez, Mario Andres (I48)
 
74 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Skinner, Michael Alan (I84)
 
75 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Skinner, Michael Louis (I88)
 
76 (Medical):Noah Lester Moore, husband of Sadie Ruth Seago Moore, was born in a log house on what is now known as Sardis Church Road in rural Tishomingo County.

Noah was the fourth child born to George Calvin Moore and Ella Lou Bonds. His three older siblings were James Farmer, William Hafford and Melvie. His seven younger siblings were Hershel Bill, Ida Bell, Carrie Lee, George Guy, Amy Caroline, Blanche Frances and Fannie.

Very little is known about Noah's younger years. He had four siblings who did not reach old age.

Noah married Sadie Ruth Seago. They lived near Fulton. Mississippi, until after Eloise and Dutch were born. Then they moved to rural Holmes County and lived at Crossroads. Edith, Jean, Minette, Melvin and Billie were all born while they lived there. In 1944, they moved into their new brick house on Highway 17. In 1948 their eighth child, Loretta, was born. She was the only one of the children born in a hospital. The rest were born at home.

In his early years, Noah logged and owned a sawmill. After he sold his sawmill, he raised cattle for as long as he lived. Noah loved to read his children's school library books. He enjoyed robbing bee trees and sharing the honey with his family. He enjoyed attending basketball games when some of his daughters were playing. Noah wasn't much of a talker. He sat in his rocking chair and chewed his Days Work tobacco. He drove to town most days and visited with his friends at Howard Terry's garage and at Simpson, Stepp and Lott Lumber Company.

His other six siblings also enjoyed longer lives. Farmer died at seventy-nine, Hershal at seventy-two, Ida Bell at seventy-nine, Carrie at eighty-six, Amy at ninety-one, and Blanche at eighty-two. Most of them died of congestive heart failure or from a stroke. Blanche died of complications from lung problems. 
Moore, Noah Lester (I16)
 
77 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Aldridge, Pamela Moore (I56)
 
78 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Marshall, Preston Brooks (I74)
 
79 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Marshall, Roger Lee (I71)
 
80 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Smith, Ruby Carolyn (I30)
 
81 (Medical):Sadie "Ruth" Seago was the sixth child born to Lemmie Dossie Seago and Lou Tishiey "Ludie" McNutt. Her older siblings were Mary Leona, Georgia Gertrude, Cora Blanche and twin brothers, Frank and Andy. She had one younger sibling, Dalton Gilbert. When Ruth's father died, the oldest child was twelve and the youngest was one. Since her father died when she was only three and a half years old, Ruth has no memory of him except for a few photographs.

Growing up in the early 1900's without a father meant that Ruth and her siblings had many chores to do. As each child reached a certain age, they were expected to help with the chores appropriate for that age. She enjoyed going to school and liked to read, write and work math problems. When she was in the ninth grade, she dropped out of school to help more with the chores at home. In order to provide food for their families, most people back then raised large gardens and spent much of the hot, summer days canning the many vegetables those gardens produced.

As Ruth got older, she and her friends and cousins attended dances and church functions. At one of those functions, she met Noah Lester Moore. One day before her twenty-first birthday, they were married at the Tishomingo County Courthouse in Iuka, Mississippi. They moved near Fulton, Mississippi, in Itawamba County. After Eloise and Dutch were born, they moved to rural Holmes County.

They first lived in a small "shotgun" house. Edith and Jean were born while they lived there. Then they built a nicer white house. Minette, Melvin and Billie were born there. Noah hired Bertha to help Ruth with the cooking, cleaning, washing, ironing, and caring for the children. Ruth's mother also came for lengthy visits when the twins and Billie were small. In 1944 the family moved into a new brick house approximately two miles North of Lexington on Highway 17. In 1948 their last child, Loretta, was born.

Ruth was a homemaker. With her large family, there was no time to seek outside employment. However, she did provide day care for Pam and Mark, two of her grandchildren, while their mothers worked. At one time she also provided day care for two of her great-nieces. She occupied her time by cooking, cleaning the house, washing and ironing the clothes. In the spring she always planted a big garden. The children who had not yet left home helped her pick the vegetables and can them in order to have food for the winter. When she went to her garden, she always wore a shirt with long sleeves and her bonnet.

After Noah's death, Ruth's lifestyle continued in much the same way. Her mother instilled in her a good work ethic and she was always busy with some household chore, working in her yard and garden, or cutting out patterns and piecing quilt tops. Later, she would quilt the tops and share them on special occasions with her children and grandchildren. Those occasions were usually when they graduated from high school or married. She enjoyed watching the soap operas each afternoon. The highlight of her week was going to Sunday school and church each Sunday. She served as secretary of her Sunday school class and sang alto with the LLL choir when it was their turn to perform.

In 1981 she was diagnosed with chronic leukemia and lymphoma. On July 18, 1985, she fell in the oncologist's office in Jackson and broke her left hip. She recovered from that injury and continued to live alone. On April 26, 1996, while planting flower seeds, she fell and broke her right hip. After that surgery she developed a staph infection and the prosthesis had to be removed. For the past six years, Otis Lee Sly/Sanders has been Ruth's caregiver on weekdays. A family member has provided her care at night and on weekends. 
Seago, Sadie 'Ruth' (I17)
 
82 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Wilson, Sarah Alissa (I6)
 
83 (Medical):See attached sources. Taylor, Annie Laura (I275)
 
84 (Medical):See attached sources. Moore, Finis Lee (I227)
 
85 (Medical):See attached sources. Barnes, Ruby Faye (I4568)
 
86 (Medical):See attached sources. Barnes, Jimmy Hugh (I4573)
 
87 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Marshall, Susan Jo (I64)
 
88 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Berryhill, Tammi "Nicole" (I86)
 
89 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Skinner, Tiffany RenĂ¡ (I82)
 
90 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Tracee Blair (I112)
 
91 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Tracy Neal (I109)
 
92 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Lerch, Victor (I65)
 
93 (Medical):Walter "Nathan" Aldridge, husband of Edith Corrine Moore Aldridge, was born in Grenada, Mississippi. Nathan attended school at West, Mississippi.

He enlisted in the Army in August 1943 during World War II. He missed his senior year of high school. He was stationed in Oklahoma for basic training and in Okinawa during the war. He was wounded in the shoulder. The shrapnel was never removed. The Army sent him to Hawaii for rest and recuperation. Nathan was awarded a Purple Heart. In 1944 he also received a Sharp Shooter Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. In January 1946 he received an honorable discharge from the Army.

After returning home from service, Nathan took courses under the G. I. Bill at Holmes Junior College in Goodman, Mississippi. On June 11, 1950, he married Edith Moore at the Baptist parsonage in Durant, Mississippi.

Nathan worked at Weathersby Chevrolet Company, Horan TV, and was employed by Simpson, Stepp, and Lott Lumber Company as a salesman at the time of his death.

Nathan was very active in the First Baptist Church. He served as a deacon, taught a youth group in Baptist Training Union and also taught a men's Sunday school class. This class was named for him after his death. Nathan was known throughout his neighborhood for the chimes he made and shared with his friends and family. 
Aldridge, Walter Nathan (I27)
 
94 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Stringer, Madelyn Grace (I9948)
 
95 (Medical):William "Louis" Skinner, husband of Dorothy Minette Moore Skinner, was born in Lexington, Mississippi.

One of Louis's first jobs was folding newspapers by hand. Louis attended Lexington High School and graduated in 1953. He entered the Army on August 17, 1956. While in the Army, Louis attained the rank of Sergeant. He was stationed in Korea. He served as an American Security Agent. He was awarded the National Defense Service Medal. Louis was honorably discharged from the Army on July 31, 1961. For a period of time he worked in some intelligence capacity in Washington, D.C. When he returned to Mississippi, Louis took some college courses at Holmes Junior College in Goodman, Mississippi, and later at Mississippi College in Clinton, Mississippi. He sold insurance for Life of Georgia Insurance Company.

In October of 1960 Louis joined the Jackson Police Department as a raw recruit. By 1971 he had progressed to the rank of Detective Lt. At the time of his death, he was head of the new FBI Intelligence Unit.

Louis was killed in Jackson as a result of a gun battle that erupted and lasted about twenty minutes. Seventeen Jackson police officers joined seventeen FBI agents in a joint effort to apprehend a Republic of New Africa (RNA) fugitive wanted by the Detroit police on a murder warrant. Louis was shot in the head by one of the RNA members and never regained consciousness. Twenty-one hours later on August 19, 1971, Louis died. He is buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery in Lexington, Mississippi. After Louis's death, the police-training academy in Jackson was named the William Louis Skinner Police Training Academy in his honor.

Louis was a member of Hillcrest Baptist Church, the Miss-Tenn Peace Officers Association, the Fraternal Order Police Brothering and the Masonic Capitol Lodge 600. His hobby was visiting Civil War battlefields and collecting Civil War relics. 
Skinner, William Louis (I29)
 
96 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Skinner, William Louis II (I77)
 
97 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Skinner, William Louis III (I83)
 
98 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hubbert, Kenna Reese (I12432)
 
99 (Research):"Let Solomon, my son, have license to marry Sary Wilhoit, she is the daughter of Solomon Wilhoit." Signed by Ezekiel Stansbury on 14 October 1809, Greene County (TN) Marriages No. #9293. Stansberry, Solomon Ezekiel (I6210)
 
100 (Research):"Park" and Julia went to North Carolina to settle but returned and settled on Mouse Creek, McMinn County, Tenn. Their first child, Mary, died on the return trip and was buried beside the road, in a coffin made of wood from the covered wagon. Willson, William Parkinson "Park" (I5877)
 

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